Hinchingbrooke House

Hinchingbrooke school called us in to restore the famous Samuel Pepy’s steps, main boundery wall which are both on the at risk register and the bow windows on the main part of the old house.

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Hinchingbrooke House in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, was built around an 11th-century nunnery. After the Reformation it passed into the hands of the Cromwell family, and subsequently, became the home of the Earls of Sandwich, including John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, reputedly the “inventor” of the modern sandwich.
On 8 March 1538, Richard Williams (alias Cromwell) had the grant of the nunnery of Hinchinbrook, in Huntingdonshire, for the undervalued price of £19. 9s. 2d. while he was an official Visitor overseeing the dissolution of the monasteries. His son,Henry Williams (alias Cromwell)—a grand father of Oliver Cromwell—built the house adjoining to the nunnery, and upon the bow windows he put the arms of his family, with those of several others to whom he was allied.
In 1970, it became part of Hinchingbrooke School, housing the 6th form. Hinchingbrooke School was formerly Huntingdon Grammar School which, on the site of what is now the Cromwell Museum in Huntingdon, was attended by Oliver Cromwelland Samuel Pepys. The school now has around 1900 pupils.
More recently, while still being used as a school Hinchingbrooke House has also become used as a conference centre, and is also for, dinner dances and as a wedding venue. It is open for tours on Sunday afternoons in the summer season.

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Samuel Pepys 23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703 was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament who is now most famous for the diary he kept for a decade while still a relatively young man. Although Pepys had no maritime experience, he rose by patronage, hard work and his talent for administration, to be the Chief Secretary to the Admiralty under both King Charles II and subsequently King James II.
His influence and reforms at the Admiralty were important in the early professionalisation of the Royal Navy.
The detailed private diary Pepys kept from 1660 until 1669 was first published in the 19th century, and is one of the most important primary sources for the English Restoration period. It provides a combination of personal revelation and eyewitness accounts of great events, such as the Great Plague of London, the Second Dutch War and the Great Fire of London.
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